Teamwork

Teamwork

Luma Learning Strategies in the Transportation Industry

What qualities make a great team? Are your teams together in the same physical location? Are you working at home? Does one factor make a team more or less valuable? In this Luma Learning Strategy we will focus on the socratic dialogue strategy to discuss these questions about teamwork.
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Our free Luma Learning Lessons include objectives, estimated time, materials and instructional procedures for classroom and online/blended teaching. We will provide strategies on how to use our new LumaLive technology to collaborate virtually in real-time. We include these pillars from our learning research to illustrate where they are infused in our lessons.

Interaction Types


For decades there has been discussions of interaction types in education. (Anderson, 2003) Most interaction types observed in driver training traditionally are learner to instructor or learner to content. Moreover, most interaction time with driver training and orientation is synchronous or at the same time. This Learning Strategy is going to help you think about ways you can hold training without a physical classroom.

Interaction Time

The following Lesson is broken down into two different interaction times.

Lesson #37: Teamwork

Objectives

  • Decide why we should have teams.
  • Determine the benefits of teams and what makes them effective.
  • Identify the roles of team members and how they contribute to a team’s success.

Estimated Time

60 minutes

Materials

Instructional Procedures for Synchronous Training
(or at the same time without a classroom)
  1. Meet in a webinar technology, like LumaLive.
  2. EfficiencySet the stage for this questioning approach by discussing the power of questions in coming to resolutions and ideas.
  3. EfficiencyBreak students into different break out groups. They can meet in their own LumaLive meeting space.
  4. EfficiencySet down conversation guidelines like 1) refer to each other by name, 2) participate by building on conversations, 3) participate often with comments and reactions to ideas of others, 4) don’t dominate the stage, 5) feel free to disagree, but don’t be disagreeable, and 6) wait your turn.
  5. EfficiencyRemind students there are no right or wrong answers.
  6. EfficiencyHave each group come up with a team leader that will take notes and a team name.
  7. EngagementEfficiencyHave each group come up with a team leader that will take notes and a team name.
  8. EfficiencyText or email each group the Socratic Dialogue Discussion Cards. Feel free to assign different groups with different discussion questions.
  9. EfficiencyStudents meet in small breakout groups.
  10. EngagementWhen they come back from timer discussions, debrief with them:
    • What was one Ah Ha! moment you had with your group?
    • What was one Oh No! moment you had with your group?
    • What was one Hmm…! moment you had with your group?
    • What was one Oh Yeah! moment you had with your group?
  11. Optional: Have everyone complete this survey on Team Effectiveness. Discuss the results.

Instructional Procedures for Asynchronous Training
(or not at the same time)
  1. EfficiencyAssign the Teamwork eNugget®. Make sure they complete the Team Effectiveness Survey.
  2. EfficiencyPost in a moderated discussion board: What were the results of your survey?
    • What was one Ah Ha! moment you had reading the content or seeing the results of your survey?
    • What was one Oh No! moment you had reading the content or seeing the results of your survey?
    • What was one Hmm…!moment you had reading the content or seeing the results of your survey?
    • What was one Oh Yeah! Moment you had reading the content or seeing the results of your survey?
  3. AuthenticityEngagementPost one comment or question to one other student.

Reference:

Anderson, T. (2003). Modes of interaction in distance education: Recent developments and research questions. Handbook of distance education, 129-144.